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25 May 2017
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Introduction:

1. Exemption clauses are provisions in a contract in terms of which a party is protected from certain claims in respect of damages, loss, negligence, non-performance etc. An example of an exemption clause is the following:

“The buyer shall not have or acquire any claim against the seller, nor shall the seller be liable in contract or delict for any general, special or consequential damages sustained by the buyer or any third party flowing directly or indirectly from this contract whether due to acts, omissions or otherwise of the seller or its employees or agents or any other person for whom the seller may be held liable, and the buyer hereby indemnifies the seller and holds it harmless against any such claim as aforesaid.”

2. Such clauses can obviously have onerous implications for the non-benefitting party as they have the effect of excluding or limiting liability on the part of one of the contracting parties. Our Courts have, on a number of occasions, been tasked with assessing whether or not such clauses can be enforced. Recent cases in this regard will be discussed below, in order that our Courts’ historic approach to exemption clauses may be illustrated.


3. Since these decisions were handed down, the Consumer Protection Act, Act 68 of 2008, (hereinafter referred to as “the Act”) has come into force. This Act deals extensively with exemption clauses and the relevant provisions thereof will also be discussed below as this will have an impact on how our Courts approach such exemption clauses in future.

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Written by Sandra Bester (LLB)
Associate, Markram Incorporated Attorneys

Edited by: Creamer Media Reporter
 
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